Tuesday, August 07, 2007

C IS FOR CAT-TAILS


This is ABC Wednesday. Today's letter is "C".
We have these CAT -TAILS growing in our backyard.
Check out Mrs.Nesbitts blog and join the group for ABC Wednesday.
Click on the picture to enlarge it.
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24 comments:

Ali said...

Beautiful photograph.

Olivier said...

Je ne trouve pas la traduction française de "CAT-TAILS", c'est de l'herbe à chat ?


I do not find the translation French of “CAT-TAILS”, it is grass with cat?

Mike said...

Great photo. I like your knotty knotty picture too.

Meg in Nelson said...

Love them; look very sculptural.

Moi said...

very pretty....did not know that's what they are called!!!

Paula said...

Sue, interesting knot in the wood from yesterday. Also, just read recently that the tall fuzzy part of the cattails can be eaten like corn-on-the-cob while it's still green. Hmmm. Don't know that I'll put that one to the test. Great photo, though. Your photos are always great!

Paula said...

I couldn't figure out how to e-mail the peach cobbler recipe to you. Could you e-mail me instead? homesteading@comcast.net

GiuCe said...

beautiful plants!

Abraham Lincoln said...

Oh gosh I have tried to recreat places for these to grow but was never successful. This is a nice photo.

Abraham Lincoln
Brookville Daily Photo

barkfoot said...

You're lucky to have these in your garden. You can eat almost every part of these. The root/ rhizomes are nice roasted on a fire then broken open and sucked. The nodule on the root in spring can be removed and sliced like water chestnut. The longer shoots in early summer can be treated as leeks. If you make a nick in the stem at the beginning of the season it oozes a syrup that you can make into sweets. The seed head when immature can be steamed and eaten. The pollen can be collected and used as a fine flour for fancy biscuits. You'll never be hungry again!

Steve said...

Good composition in this.

Annie said...

Aren't they just the most interesting of plants? You're lucky to have them near enough that you can watch them go through transitions to fluff.

Beverly said...

I love all that I learned from the one comment about cattails. I love those plants too.

Interesting photo yesterday.

John Roberts said...

I really like the composition on this one!

Mike said...

Wow, cat tails in the backyard. That is unusual. I agree, the composition here is very nice. Thanks for your faithful visits to my blog.

Anna said...

Pretty curves in this Sue. I could have a lot of fun shooting those I think!

Lucy said...

You have an awesome backyard. Full of surprises.

Zsolt said...

very nice picture..reminds me of the lake Balaton!

Ex-Shammickite said...

My goodness, I jusat read Barkfoots comment, I had no idea that these cat-tails could provide so much food. I usually call them Bullrushes, must be my Britich upbringing!

bluemountainmama said...

these grew in our pond on our farm growing up.... they always fascinated me for some reason. they remind me of corndogs. :)

WalksFarWoman said...

Great 'C'!
I never knew what these plants were called - so thanks for that. :)

Laurie said...

I love cat tails. I saw a lot of them along the highways we traveled this week looking at colleges but had no time to stop and photograph them.

Well done!

Wendy said...

I love cat tails and this is a great photo of them. Do you ever twist them and watch as they explode into a fluffy mess? Such a fun plant for children. I had no idea they were edible from root to tip, till I read the comment made by barkfoot. From what I've noticed - these plants only grow near, or in, a watery area.

And, thanks for all your kind comments. I think you and Moonshadow are right about the big white bird being a Great Egret. Now that I know, I'm going to change my post title.

mrsnesbitt said...

I missed this!
Great shot too.
Dxx